The 10 Commandments of a Life in Technology

Love.

Love what you do, or don’t do it. Love the people that inevitably come with software development and technology: Engineers, managers, testers, users and people that “just don’t get it”. Love the ecosystem unconditionally, or find something else.

Be Positive

Those that go looking for problems can do precisely one of two things: They can fix it, or they can move on. No good comes from ranting about things, and generally it only serves to decrease the signal to noise ratio. Fix things. Leave things better than you found them. Organize. Open up possibilities. Explore new avenues. Look to the future. Avoid the negative, because it has no future.

Lift Up. Don’t Push Down

People all around you will make mistakes, just as you will. What can you do to lift them up? What can you do to help? See opportunities to improve your team, your processes, your knowledge at all times.

Learn

Technology is nothing like when we started. It isn’t anything like it was last year. This is the constant state of our industry, so embrace it. Go learn something new. Ask yourself if you are adding new experiences to your knowledge or the same one over and over again. Fail to do this, and face being swept away.

Sell

Everyone is in sales. So sell your ideas well. Selling your own ideas is much more difficult than sitting around just shooting holes in other’s arguments. If you don’t put forward ideas of your own, you’re not pushing yourself enough, and quite frankly, you’re coasting.

Go Deep

Attempt to learn one thing inside and out. Share your knowledge. Blog. Speak. If you want to know something well, try teaching it to others.

Go Wide

Know a lot of supporting technologies. It will change the way you look at your specialties and that’s a good thing. New technologies force you to change your point of view. Multiple points of view in developing a system is paramount. Know what is good and what is bad about these supporting cast members, and most importantly, when and when not to use them.

Be Uncomfortable

When you know something well, you settle in and get comfortable. Sometimes being comfortable closes the door to new ways of thinking, new ways of moving forward and new opportunities. Do something everyday that makes you a little uncomfortable.

Go Analog

In technology, it is a bit natural that we while away so many hours at the keyboard. However, many people do not share this trait, nor ever want to do so. Get in their shoes. Ditch the computer on the weekends. Go run, forget about everything, and you may be surprised how many new ideas jump in your head while you’re out in the real world.

Have Other Interests

If the technology you use and know needs to be multi-dimensional, shouldn’t you be as well? Go to a Toastmasters meeting and try speaking about something not computer related. Climb a mountain. Paint. There is so much to do and so little time, so try something new this week.

In All These Things, Be Yourself

Technology is ingrained into almost everything we do. Make the different facets of who you are, your experience, and your interests bring a different view of how technology can be used to a new advantage.

Of Lorems and Ipsii

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo^1 dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

Some code:

js var hello = function (name) { console.log(“Hello, ” + name + ‘.’); } hello(‘World’); // prints ‘Hello, World.’ to stdout

Of Lorems and Ipsii

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo^1 dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

Some code:

js var hello = function (name) { console.log(“Hello, ” + name + ‘.’); } hello(‘World’); // prints ‘Hello, World.’ to stdout